Johann Metz, martyrdom, Oscar Romero

The Dangerous Jesus in the Martyrdom of an Archbishop (Part 1: Introduction)

I did a paper this last semester on Archbishop Oscar Romero and the political theology of Johann Metz. The reader following this blog would see this very clearly, with more than a few posts devised to think through, or the result of reflections on where to take the paper.

The process of posting has proved incredibly helpful for me. It is better than simply writing down notes, and it can be more helpful than verbally discussing the subject. Why? This blog maintains a search-able record of one’s thoughts, as well as those thoughts commented on by others. I’ve found this is the best reason to blog. However, this is an inherently messy process, in both thought and grammar. Thankfully I don’t mind and it appears others do not as well.

This is all mentioned to explain why I am yet again returning to the paper I wrote. The paper writing process was a synthesizing, which help clarifies direction, but now the synthesis could use expansion once again. Perhaps different directions this time to complicate or mature the thought in the argument. And so, below is a very brief introduction to the argument, while the rest of the will follow in the days to come. Let me know what you think:

The Dangerous Jesus in the Martyrdom of an Archbishop: Oscar Romero, Johann Metz, and the Iconography of the Interruptive No

The thesis of this argument is as follows: using Romero and Metz, I seek to solidify the link between the Gospel and Christian politics against idolatrous power through both the life of Romero and Metz’s political theology. I first address the thought of Romero, specifically as displayed in his four pastorals and other speeches. Next I move to the structure of his theology embodied in his own life unto death, as he confronted self-serving power. I then elaborate a theology parallel to the thought and life of Romero: the dangerous theology of Metz that seeks to subversively remember the poor, oppressed, and dead so that the dangerous memory of the past can be lived dangerously today. Lastly, I conclude with a synthesis that draws the martyrdom of Romero together with the theology of Metz.

See parts 2, 3, and 4 for the rest.

Advertisements
Standard

4 thoughts on “The Dangerous Jesus in the Martyrdom of an Archbishop (Part 1: Introduction)

  1. Pingback: The Dangerous Jesus in the Martyrdom of an Archbishop (Part 3: Metz) « flying.farther

  2. Pingback: The Dangerous Jesus in the Martyrdom of an Archbishop (Part 4: Romero and Metz) « flying.farther

  3. Pingback: “Si me matan, resucitaré en el pueblo salvadoreño.” « Vox Nova

  4. Pingback: “Si me matan, resucitaré en el pueblo salvadoreño.” | catholicanarchy.org™

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s